Great leaders are easy to imagine — the dedicated leader first in the office and the last to kick rocks. The technical leader with the knowledge to repair and replace any system. The inspirational one who can pull your attention with the calming command of his voice. And the brave one with the zest to bring together the team and exude certainty in the task at hand.

Setting the bar for leadership seems to be a series of smaller, more nimble bars that can be challenging to keep track of. I need to be more dedicated, knowledgable, selfless, savvy, and confident all at once? That is a tall order. Or, at least it seems like a tall order.

The leadership formula is not a series of individual hurdles that need a daily checklist to clear. It’s not a set of rules or mental bullet points. It’s a simple mindset that filters your daily motions and actions into one clean standard: The millennial leadership mindset is one that uncovers, comprehends, and acts on the collective purpose-driven motivators that drives individual and team success. 

People must work for their values and purpose, first. Purpose drives action.

At the core, a job is not an obligation — we do not have to work a particular job. At-will employment allows you or your employer to cut ties at any time.

As the leader, you must discover the individual purpose-driven factors for your teammates that make them set an alarm in the evening, wake up early in the morning, battle insane traffic, and show up on time ready to work. Yes, money is always a driving factor because food, housing, and 4G cost money. However, gone are the days where people work just to make a living.

Millennials(expected 50% of the workforce by 2020) overwhelmingly prioritize personal values, work/life balance, and growth opportunities when searching for the perfect employer. That said, the millennial leader uncovers the purpose and works to satisfy the “why” for his teammates.

You must find out about those who you share the space: Why do you work here?

This mindset allows you to inject your personal leadership into any situation without thinking, “what would a leader do here?” Leaders can arrive on-scene at different times throughout your day, but the consistent leader who can uncover the purpose is coveted at every turn.

And if you play for the name on the front of the jersey, you better bet they will remember the name on the back of the jersey when it comes promotion time. Just be sure to remain humble when accepting that pay(and responsibility) raise.

1 Comment

  1. Frank Van Buren
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    Great post, TP! Spot on! Frank Van Buren